Hiking During a Pandemic

I always feel better when I’m outside, where the air is fresh and the sunlight provides a healthy dose of vitamin D.  Now that the COVID-19 virus is sweeping the globe, getting outdoors sounds better than it ever has.  Many of us are following the guidelines of “shelter in place” recommendations, working from home and limiting trips to the stores.  In most places however, it is permissible to hit the trail, if not encouraged.  An exception to this is hiking on trails with high foot traffic, that are not in your local area or hiking where you put yourself, and more importantly, first responders at risk.  So stay local, stay safe, but get outside if you can.  It will do wonders for your psyche.

I managed my first hike today since the shit hit the fan and I found it was exactly what I needed.  Hikes always feel good but this one was different, like I needed it.  Admittedly, it was a bit strange at times though, a woman went 15 feet off the trail to go around me, to maintain her distancing, albeit almost triple what is recommended.  This hike was in Boulder after all so I’m used to strange things happening out there.  Extreme social distancing aside, being on the trail and away from the news, it feels like nothing is happening out there in the world.  I remember reading about hikers that were down in the Grand Canyon during 9/11 with no cell service oblivious to the events happening above the rim.  When they eventually made it out of the canyon days later, they learned the terrible news of what happened and they recalled how strange it was that there were no planes flying overhead.  On this day, if it weren’t for hikers wearing N95 masks, you’d never know there was a pandemic going on.

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I admit that I do not understand any more than the next person about the virus and where the safest place to be is during all of this.  What I do know is that being outside, away from crowds is a good, and relatively safe place to be.  Just keep your distance, don’t touch anything, bring hand sanitizer,  gloves, and a mask and you can have a brief respite from the stresses of our new reality.

It’s important to keep our bodies and minds active and healthy during this time.  Get some air if you can and be safe out there!  So if you get a hike in, be safe, stay local, don’t take unnecessary risks, and obey the law!  In case you need a little inspiration, here are a few reminders of what’s out there…

 

Hot on the Trail of a Troll in Breckenridge Colorado

I really like unique hikes and this has to be one of the most unique hikes of all, because of what you find at the end, which in this case is a large troll.  However, this is not a hike in the truest sense of the word being that it is so short and very much in the center of town. The troll, named Isak Heartstone, can be reached via the Trollstigen Trail in the town of Breckenridge, Colorado. The troll was designed by Thomas Dambo, a Copenhagen based artist who specializes in reduce-reuse-recycle (the troll is a combination of all three ‘R’s’.)

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The trail is very short and flat, about 1/2 mile round trip so it is perfect for families with kids.  Even without kids, a hike on the Trollstigen Trail is so different because of the wooden art troll at the turnaround.  The troll stands at about 15’ tall and does not seem out of place at all.  Breckenridge is one of many places around the world that can boast having one of these fairytale pieces of art.

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The trailhead can be accessed from the center of town near the ice rink.  We walked there from the town center, just to add a few more steps since the hike itself is so short but you can also take a shuttle to the trailhead.

For more information on the other trolls Thomas has built around the world look him  up on social media to learn more about his projects and the vision he has to make the world a better place through art and recycling.

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Capilano Suspension Bridge – North Vancouver

If you do any internet search for the top things to do in Vancouver, the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park will surely come up.  It is as unique as it is popular, which is I guess what most people are looking to do on vacations right?  I do not typically like to go to the heavily touristed spots, mostly because they are normally quite crowded. But during the winter months at Capilano, the crowds are significantly less than in the summer.  I also don’t like to spend a lot for tickets and this place is pricey at $53.95 CAD per person.  However, we spoke to another couple while we were taking in a Vancouver Canucks hockey game when we first arrived and they said it was a must do, especially if you go at night during the winter when the forest is decorated with lights for what the park calls Canyon Lights.  So my wife and I decided to give it a go on a cold and rainy Vancouver night.

From the moment we walked into the place, we couldn’t help but notice how clean and organized it was, the word spotless came to mind. I was still skeptical if this was going to be worth the price of admission but once I saw all of the offerings, I started to feel quite encouraged.

Most people immediately head for the parks namesake suspension bridge but we decided to do the Cliffwalk first.  The walk is along a granite canyon face and is held in place with eight cables that are connected to a single anchor point. It sounds like it isn’t enough to keep you safe but when you see it, you just know it will do the job.  As I’ve written in previous articles, I have an issue with heights so this was a true test for me, and I didn’t pee myself! Down below on the rainforest floor the Capilano River flows, and while walking along the Cliffwalk I was in awe as I saw two eagles following above the curve of the water. It was an unexpected bonus.

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The Cliffwalk

Moving on to the suspension bridge, which takes you 230 above the Capilano River, you’ll sway for over 450 feet before planting your feet on terra firma on the other side.  The walk across the bridge was exciting and began to give the park a Swiss Family Robinson feel, which we really enjoyed. Beware of tourists stopping suddenly in front of you all along the bridge to capture that ‘perfect’ selfie shot.

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Capilano Suspension Bridge

Once on the other side, you’ll see what is called the Treetops Adventure which is seven smaller suspension bridges strung between the evergreens as high off the ground as 100 feet.  The Swiss Family Robinson feeling is now in full swing.

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Treetops Adventure

The park embraces native culture and you’ll find totem poles and other First Nations art on site.  If you manage to be here at night during the winter holiday season, you’ll be treated to lights all over the place, adding even more character to the park.

We spent over four hours in the park and enjoyed every minute of it.  It was expensive and a bit touristy but we loved it and it was so worth it.  So if you’re ever in Vancouver, you should definitely go to the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park.

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Hiking in Indiana? That’s right, Indiana!

I’m convinced that you can hike anywhere, even in the cities. The Irish call it “walking” and some walks are more like hikes and hikes more like walks.  Confusing?  Just put on your pack and get out there!  Ever walked in San Francisco? It’s harder than most hikes you can find in almost any National Park.  Whenever I travel to a new place, I usually get out a map and start looking for blank spaces or green spots near to where I’m traveling to.  On a recent trip to Indianapolis, I spent some time looking at a map and found some empty spaces and greenery south of the city in Brown County, near the small town of Nashville, Indiana that is.  Brown County State Park (Indiana’s largest), Hoosier National Forest, and Yellowwood State Forest all show up well on the map and roughly just and hour or so from Indy.

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The hills of Brown County State Park | Indiana

So let’s just start where I did, in Brown County State Park.  The park has about 20 miles of hiking trails and another 27 that are multi-use, which compared to some other places is not much. But I didn’t come to Indiana to hike, it was on the back-end of a business trip that I extended a couple of days to see family in the area (Bloomington) and I managed a little exploring on the side as well.  My hotel was in the quaint town of Nashville about a mile from the north entrance of the park and it turned out to be the perfect place to stretch my legs and get some fresh air.  My first hike was on the 2.2 mile Fire Tower Trail (aka Trail 10) which follows ridges and ravines as a loop.  The loop begins and ends at a 90’ converted fire lookout tower that now serves as an antenna tower open to visitors to climb.  Admittedly, I have a healthy fear of heights and my first climb at the beginning of the hike ended in me seizing up about halfway to the top and turning around.  After hiking the loop, I decided to try again and this time made it up to the top.  I am actually a bit surprised that you are legally allowed to climb this tower but I’m grateful that it was. Nearby is a small nature center that I enjoyed so much that I realized that I’m getting old.  Inside, there are living and non-living (taxidermy) fauna to view.  Live animals included snakes like the Timber Rattlesnake, Copperhead, Black Rat, and Milk (red on black, friend of Jack). There is also a two-way mirror looking out into a bird feeder and this was clearly (intended pun) were all of the action was.  Very fat squirrels battled it out for the primo spots and birds (including my favorite, the cardinal) tried to stay a safe distance away from them, while still managing a free meal.

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Male Cardinal

Another nice trail in Brown County State Park was the short but scenic Ogle Lake Trail.  At only 1.5 miles, the trail is really just a warmup to some of the other connected trails you can hike from this area.  I connected to the Taylor Ridge Trail, which can add another 5.5 miles onto your hike (I didn’t make it that far).

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Ogle Lake

All in all, there are plenty of shorter hiking options in southern Indiana that you might enjoy the next time you’re passing through.  If you’re looking for some decent comfort food, try the Nashville General Store and Bakery in Nashville.  For really good apres randonnee beers, try Upland Brewing Company in Columbus (I had more than one Modern Tart Kettle Sour Ale).  So if you happen to be in Central Indiana and you need a nature fix for a day or two, Brown County is a good place to be.

Goody Two Shoes in Amsterdam

Most people know Amsterdam for two primary reasons: legalized soft drugs like marijuana and mushrooms as well as legalized prostitution.  However, drugs like marijuana are now legal in many places around the world, including in Colorado where I live, and Amsterdam’s soft drug culture is not as mutually exclusive as it once was. Amsterdam also has perhaps the most famous red light district in the world. But what if this sort of thing isn’t for you? Why would anyone come to this city if you aren’t into what it is most famous for?  Well, there is so much more to this city than red lights and cafe’s (where you go to smoke).  I had a great time in Amsterdam and skipped all of the things most people visit this unique city for.  So here are just a few recommendations I have for someone who wants an atypical A’dam experience:

See the Tulips

I visited Amsterdam in the spring with my father with one of his bucket list items being to see the world famous tulips of Holland. Keukenhof Gardens and the bulb fields in and around the town of Lisse were the best place to see them and both places were accessible by tour bus or public transport. Both of these flowery destinations were amazing in their own right with my father preferring Kuekenhof Gardens while I liked the fields of flowers just a little more.  The two vastly different was of seeing the flowers were both incredibly beautiful with the carefully sculpted gardens displaying more varieties of tulips and colors than I ever could imagine.  The carpeted fields around Lisse offered a glimpse into the farming side of the business with field after field of long brilliantly colored textures, one farm after another.  One uniquely Dutch way to see the fields is to rent a bike after finishing up at Keukenhof and see the fields at a slower pace than you would in a car or tour bus.  To see the tulips in full bloom, you can go from about mid-March to mid-May.  We went smack dab in the middle of that and chose mid-April to make sure we didn’t miss it, since the peak season can vary from year to year.

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Kuekenhof Gardens
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Bulb Fields, Lisse

Bicycle

I work in bicycling crazy Boulder Colorado, at least I thought it was crazy until coming to Amsterdam.  Boulder is a college town so there are always students zipping around campus and the outlying areas.  The city is also big on alternative energy and transportation, adding to the college cycling mindset. I have even seen people biking to work when temperatures are below zero, Fahrenheit.  Portland Oregon also has a similar mindset and cyclists there go out in some of the rainiest conditions in America. Amsterdam cyclists are on a whole other level.  Cold, they bike. Need to get across town, they bike. Dressed for work in fancy clothes, they bike.  They don’t bike to be seen. They aren’t rude or arrogant like many cyclists I’ve seen.  It is a place that has an amazing bike culture, unrivaled anywhere in the world that I have been.  At any given intersection, bikes can outnumber cars by a ratio of four to one.  One of the most fun days I had in Amsterdam was cycling through the city on a rented cruiser bike and I wish that I had done it more.

 

Drink Some Dutch Beer

The beer in Amsterdam is famous primarily for one large brewery, Heineken.  A popular tourist stop is the Heineken Experience, which is a tour of the old Heineken factory in Amsterdam, similar to the Guinness tour in Dublin.  It was well worth the price of admission (~€20) and the tour was fun and very European.  The only problem for me was that I really don’t like their beer and I prefer the smaller breweries like I’m used to at home.  The beer that I did really like was from Brouwerij ‘t IJ, which is located close to Centraal Station and was founded in 1985.  I had the IJWIT and loved it, along with an atmosphere that was both comfortable and welcoming with a mixture of locals and tourists. Bonus: there’s a windmill just outside.

 

Explore the Canals

Amsterdam is not a unique place in and because of its canals.  Venice is more famous of course, and Bruges’ canals were cozy but Amsterdam’s canals are just plain iconic.  The city is ringed by a lengthy canal system that is a mode of transportation as well as a great way for a traveler to get up close and personal with Amsterdam.  One thing you will not see, however, is people ice skating to work in winter.  Not sure where that rumor got started but locals assured me that it wasn’t true.

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Eat Some (or a lot of) Poffertjes

Amsterdam, and Holland in general, are not yet famous for their food but I found something there that was so good that I ate it every day – poffertjes.  Poffertjes are basically mini Dutch pancakes usually served with powdered sugar and was by far my favorite food in the whole of the Netherlands.  I usually found them being sold by street vendors all over the city.  They taste great for breakfast! They taste good for lunch! They taste good as a snack!  They just taste good, everyday!

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Explore Dutch History : Windmills

No journey to Amsterdam or the Netherlands can be considered complete without seeing some windmills, and they are hard to miss. These quintessentially Dutch landmarks can be seen in the city proper (including at the aforementioned Brouwerij ‘t IJ) or in many of the surrounding towns and countryside.  Just outside of the city in Zaandam, and accessible via public transport, are the windmills of Zaanse Schans (eight in all).  This place is very touristy but I was, after all, a tourist and didn’t mind being one. This was a fun place to get up close and personal with real windmills, with a few of them actually working, both inside and out.

Windmills at Zaanse Schans

Ride Public Transport

When I travel to cities (I do however prefer the countryside to cities), I love to use public transport whenever possible. Most cities have a tourist pass that can be paid for either by the day or for multiple days, at a discounted rate. This is usually significantly cheaper than renting a car considering that you have a rental fee, gas, and parking, not to mention the difficulty navigating and city driving.  This is definitely not a good place to have a car.  Amsterdam is the first place I’ve ever taken a vacation without having a rental car and it was definitely the right choice. I was able to purchase the Amsterdam and Region Travel Ticket at the iamsterdam office at Schiphol Airport, for three days for only €36.50. The pass was easy to use and took me to all of the major areas I intended to visit during my stay.

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Honorable mentions:

A’dam Tower – Great view of the city and a unique restaurant at the top.  Take the elevator up for another uniquely Euro Dutch experience.

Museums – Although I didn’t get to visit a single museum while in Amsterdam the city is famous for them.  You’ll find the Rijksmuseum, the Anne Frank House, The Van Gogh Museum, and the Rembrandt House, just to name a few.  Next time…

Ajax Football Club – Another one for next time but Ajax football fans are said to be some of the most passionate in all of Europe, so try attending a game at the Johan Cruyff Stadium if they’re in town while you are.

If you want to enjoy a great city without those other things, Amsterdam is a wonderful place to spend a vacation.  I can’t wait to get back!

 

 

The 24 Hour Layover in Iceland : Top 5

With the 24 hour layover in Reykjavik Iceland becoming more and more common, we’ve composed this list of our Top 5 things to do in Iceland during a 24 hour layover.  In descending order they are:

#5 – The Sun Voyager

The Sun Voyager near the Sæbraut road in Reykjavik is a unique art sculpture on the shores of the Greenland Sea and is one of the more popular stops in a city that has more art than you might expect.

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The Sun Voyager – Photo by Brian Wallace

#4 – Hallgrímskirkja Church

Hallgrímskirkja Church in Reykjavik is a great place in the city to get your bearings.  The church is seen easily from almost anywhere in Reykjavik and it is centrally located, sitting atop a large hill with a commanding view of the rest of the city.

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The view of Reykjavik from Hallgrímskirkja Church                                                                             Photo by Sharon Ang – Pixabay.com
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Hallgrímskirkja – Photo by Brian Wallace

#3 – Icelandic Street Food

Lunch at Icelandic Street Food was the best and cheapest meal we had in our 24 hours in Iceland.  My Dad and I had all you can eat soups and deserts for about $38 USD with a couple of drinks tacked on as well.  The atmosphere was a little quirky (which fits well with Reykjavik) and the people there were very friendly.

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Icelandic Street Food in Reykjavik- Photo by Brian Wallace
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The bill, not bad for Iceland – Photo by Brian Wallace

#2 – Driving the Backroads

Driving the backroads near Hafnarfjörður was a great highlight if for nothing else than it was totally unplanned.  We had an awkward amount of time in Reykjavik before our flight left for home from Keflavik so I took a quick look at the map and saw that we could take the back way to Keflavik from the town of Hafnarfjörður to kill some time.  Soon after turning off of the main highway, we saw in the distance what looked like drying racks that had some unknown “stuff” hanging from it.  The “stuff” turned out to be drying fish heads and the smell was nearly unbearable but it was the best worst smell ever. We were richly rewarded for venturing off the main road without a plan.  There was also beautiful scenery along the way to the airport but forever burned into my memory, as well as my nostrils, will be the fish head drying racks of Hafnarfjörður.

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Admittedly, I was glad these weren’t shark fins

#1 – The Blue Lagoon

The Blue Lagoon in Grindavik is everything you’ve imagined it to be.  So much has been written about it before so I will not try to spin new superlatives to describe it.  I spent the better part of 10 days in Europe with my Dad and can honestly say that the three hours or so we spent at the Blue Lagoon was the best part of the trip, especially for my Dad.  You can see by the photo below that my normally very reserved father was relaxed and truly enjoying himself and had found his happy place.  This Blue Lagoon is expensive but is so worth it, especially if you’re only in Iceland for a 24 hour layover.

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So if you’re flying to Europe through Reykjavik, consider a one day layover (or more), you will probably end up calling it the best stopover you’ve ever had.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step Away From The Car… In Yellowstone

If you don’t get more than 100 feet from your car when you go to Yellowstone National Park (YNP) in Wyoming that would be a shame, but I will not judge you… however I would encourage you to hike your way to the front of the line.  In doing so, you’ll leave the vast majority of the parks visitors far behind.  YNP has some of the most incredible roadside attractions nature can offer: steaming geysers, large herds of bison, elk and deer, as well as apex predators like wolves and bears.  But all of this nature in one place has one big disadvantage: Disneyland-like crowds with no skip the line pass to make viewing it all easier.

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Bison or Buffalo?

My wife and I recently spent a few days in Yellowstone and roughly split our time equally between seeing large swaths of the park from, or very near to, our car with the other half of our trip walking into the woods to experience a much different Yellowstone than most people do.  From the car, there are the massive Yellowstone Falls in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone as well as huge herds of bison that seem very comfortable weaving through the cars and people who dare to get too close.  Bears are often seen here from your car and even wolves show face for those who are either lucky, or patient, or both. There are also thermal features within close proximity to parking lots such as the famous Old Faithful Geyser and the incredible colors of the Grand Prismatic Spring.

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Lower Yellowstone Falls

If you get out of your car and venture into the woods, you may be rewarded with a much more intimate experience in one of America’s most popular national parks. Our first hike in the park was 4.8 miles round trip to Lone Star Geyser, which can erupt up to 45 feet into the sky. This geyser erupts every three hours so timing is everything, and we lucked out and arrived (with no planning mind you) only 10 minutes before the geyser went off.  The hike is uphill to the geyser but is not steep and follows an old road that has been closed to automobile traffic (bikes are allowed). A few minutes of waiting after reaching the end of the road, the geyser began to pick up steam (pun intended) and showed rumbling signs that an eruption would be coming soon.  The geyser erupted for about 18 minutes with water shooting up first, then a few minutes of steam and it was a wonderful reward for the relatively short 2.4 mile hike to get there.  We felt like our efforts to have hiked there were instantly rewarded as there were only about 10 other people there to witness this very cool display whereas Old Faithful can have as many as 2,000 people watching an eruption.  It was also refreshing to have an unobstructed view of the geyser with no signs or ropes in the way and the best part was that it truly felt like this is how we were meant to see it, au natural so to speak.  We worked for this experience and we were richly rewarded for our efforts.

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Lone Star Geyser

Our second hike was to see Fairy Falls which is accessed near the very busy Grand Prismatic Spring area.  Once you get past the large crowds of this popular spot, you’ll find a much smaller group of sightseers on the way to the falls.  Fairy Falls is a very tall (197 feet) cascade, one of the tallest in the park, but for us the true gem of this hike unexpectedly turned out to be Imperial Geyser.  This geyser bubbled and burped the entire time we were there and again there was hardly a soul there, this time only four other hikers.  If you make this an out and back, the distance is around six miles, but there are also options to add more distance by linking to other trails in the area, which we did to add another three miles or so.  While on one of these connector trails, we came across a lone male bison just off trail that really capped off what was a very unique hike. Seeing a big bison from your car can be intimidating so imagine seeing one out on the trail!  We stayed back a safe distance to take some photos and didn’t want to end up on the news like so many others recently who have gotten too close to a wild bison.

Not everyone can hike but if you can, do.  I’m not trying to diminish the experience for others who do like to see the park from the relative safety of their cars and only walk the boardwalks. We did our fair share of this type of sightseeing, just like everyone else and it was great.  However, wildlife encounters seem to have a more authentic feeling when you see them from the trail instead of the road. The power of a wild buffalo is more pronounced when you don’t have your car to save you.  Walking through forests that have grizzly bears heightens your awareness to your surroundings (carry bear spray) and that also adds a different dynamic to the experience.  Geysers and other natural features experienced miles from the nearest parking lot mean that you might have it all to yourself, without man-made barriers.

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Twilight on Yellowstone Lake

So, if you can get a hike or two in during your stay, do it and you’ll be glad you did. Enjoy a more secluded Yellowstone experience because most people will be at the lodge, in their car, or never far from it, and that means you can experience something rare in Yellowstone, solitude.

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Bison in Lamar Valley

 

 

 

Paris : Epic Fail

I had prepared for my visit to Paris for months. Because I had heard all of the rumors that Parisians were rude to those who didn’t at least make a modest attempt to speak their language, I had practiced French nearly everyday for months in an attempt to not be the typical American who could only speak English. I really cared about respecting the culture and figured learning a few phrases would show that I was not some pretentious American.  I also researched where to go if you were pressed for time, being that I only had about 9 hours in the city.  The whole reason to visit Paris was to take my dad on the most unique day trip possible within a few hours by train from Amsterdam.  The choices were between Cologne, Luxembourg, and Paris (since we had already planned a day trip to Bruges).  So I imagined that Paris would be the most unique of the bunch but as you can tell from the title, things didn’t go so well.

The first sign warning sign that this day might not go so well was the day before we were to arrive when I heard the news that a fire at the Norte Dame Cathedral had destroyed a large portion of the church.  This was to be our first stop on “Le Grand Tour”.  The second jolt came when we were standing in Centraal Station in Amsterdam as I let my dad know that the surprise day trip was to Paris.  Not so much as anything remotely resembling any excitement.  He said “Paris huh?”, to which I replied “yup”.  “Eiffel Tower huh?”, to which I replied “yup”.  This was going to be great fun!!!

Three and a half hours later, we arrived at the hustle and bustle of Gare du Nord in Paris.  We had just started getting used to Amsterdam and all of its unique personality and now felt dropped into another world, one where English is not as common as where we had started our day.  First things first, dad needed to use the toilet and in Paris that means you have to pay, about € 0.50.  This was to me an opportunity to get rid of some loose change but to my dad…this was an outrage.

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Gare du Nord

Next up was a lesson on the Paris Metro.  My dad and I had mutually decided that we would try to use public transport rather than take the easy way and take an Uber or a hop on hop off bus.  In hindsight, this was a big mistake.  We were told that the Metro stop closest to Notre Dame was closed due to the fire the previous day so we needed to get off one stop early, which would have been fine if we had taken the train in the right direction to begin with.  It took one stop to realize we were going the wrong way and we expected a mistake or two during our visit to Paris so hopped off and then hopped on the correct train.  When we exited the dark Metro line and came up to the bright light above, I had no idea which way to go and had to use the compass app on my phone to figure out where Notre Dame was.  But all we really needed to do was to follow the crowds of people trying to see the aftermath of the previous days fire.  It was pure madness!  There were people everywhere, police everywhere, barricades everywhere, TV crews everywhere!  We glimpsed the famous yet damaged cathedral only from a distance and decided to head down to the Seine for a walk along the famous river to see the famous glass pyramid outside of the Louvre instead.

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The better side on Norte Dame
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Along the Seine

Along the Seine, we noticed a police boat directing tourist boats to turn around.  The apparent reason for this is that they had divers in the water possibly searching for a body.  My Dad had worked for years on the Brooklyn Bridge as an iron worker and had seen this sight many times before so we were fairly certain why they were there.  Although curious, we decided that seeing a body pulled from the river was not a memory we wanted of Paris so we continued on our walk to the Louvre.  Seeing the glass pyramid was great to see but perhaps the best part was seeing all of the people trying to take a picture with their finger touching the point of the pyramid, much like tourists who pretend that they are holding up the Leaning Tower of Pisa.  What makes this fun to watch is to look at them pose for the picture from an angle that isn’t directly in line with the pyramid.  They look a bit like they’re having to act out the “I’m a little teapot” song.

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The Louvre

 

After leaving the Louvre,  it was on to an appointment with a guide at the Eiffel Tower.  This, I was really looking forward to.  The only thing that stood in our way was another ride on the Metro.  With some help from the ticket lady, we believed we had all the right information to get on the correct train, which we didn’t. This time, the train went the right way but instead of taking us the two stops to Champs du Mars and the Eiffel Tower, it went one stop and then turned right back around and deposited us back at the station we had just left.  I went back to the ticket lady and she scolded me because she had told me not to get on that train, but to take the second one.  She was right!  After receiving new instructions, we jumped onto the correct train this time and made it to our scheduled rendezvous (see I do speak French) with our Eiffel Tower guide and had barely ten minutes to spare.

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The Eiffel Tower is everything it’s advertised to be! It is strikingly beautiful and is unique to both the city and the world.  The problem is that everyone wants to go up this iconic tower and that is the only bad thing I have say about it.  The lines for the elevators are long even with a reservation and going all the way to the top was out of the question, since we were so pressed for time.  We had to get back to the train station for the last train back to Amsterdam, while having to fight the Paris rush hour to get there (or the Metro). This time there would be no more mistakes on the Metro, so Uber would battle traffic on our behalf and would take all of the drama with it away.  We made it back to Gare du Nord in plenty of time, enough even to get our first and only Parisian meal, Five Guys.  Admittedly, a Five Guys burger never tasted better!

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A few notes about Paris:

  1. My Dad described the city well when he said it was like New York City but where the people speak French.  It is a big city and has a chaotic feel to it, just like NYC.
  2. We were only there a few hours, you need a few days.
  3. Don’t try to see and do everything, there will never be enough time.
  4. Plant yourself in the most Parisian neighborhood you can find, friends tell me that Montmartre is that place.
  5. Riding the Metro was tough, I am sure you will do better.
  6. Walk wherever you can, cities are always best explored by foot and you really get a feel for Paris by walking.
  7. Learn at least a few words of French.  I worked on this for a couple of months, tried my limited vocabulary whenever the situation warranted, and had no negative interactions with any locals.  We have all heard the horror stories of how Americans can be treated in Paris and I witnessed none of it.  Be humble and attempt the language!

So it was an epic fail but maybe next time will be better!

 

A Walk in Bruges

Arriving at the train station in Bruges, you get no hint of what a storybook city you’re about to enter.  The station is small and is packed with day-trippers (including us) from all over the Low Countries and beyond. My father and I were visiting from Amsterdam and took three different trains that morning just to get here and we were eager to breathe some fresh air and stretch our legs.  Following the pack from the station, we began to get our first glimpses of a city that can best be described as stunning.  After just a few minutes of walking, narrow cobblestone streets lead towards the city center and the Grote Market (or Market Square) where shops, architecture, and history all combine to make what has to be one of Europe’s most charming small cities.

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Along the way to the city center are beautiful church towers that loom large over the low lying buildings and shops of this medieval city.  Every step you take into Bruges, the sweet smells of chocolate and Belgian waffles start to assault your senses, especially if you’re hungry after the long train ride and the walk that follows. More on waffles after lunch.

The Belfry of Bruges has to be considered the signature landmark of the city.  This tower was featured prominently in the movie “In Bruges” where Brendan Gleeson met his demise. I desperately wanted to climb the staircase that he did to get up to what has to be the best view in Bruges.  The line for the tower was long and it took over an hour before I was allowed to start the climb up the tower through the narrow spiral staircase.   It took me nearly six minutes of climbing 366 steps to reach the top and I was rewarded with a mind blowing view of the market, the city of Bruges, and the West Flanders region of Belgium.  While at the top, a chorus of bells rang and only added to an already incredible atmosphere.

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DA364FD1-5043-4793-BED0-6F5B7672CC7CAfter the climb up the tower it was time for lunch in the square. There are many options for al fresco dining, which I do whenever possible. We were able to sit outside while drinking a flight of Belgian beers and eating Flemish stew, all the while taking in the sights and sounds of this thoroughly enjoyable city.

After lunch, we toured the canals by boat, which was a very different experience than the canal tour we had done in Amsterdam just days before.  Bruges’ canals are more narrow and intimate, so touring them was more up close and personal.

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235BF0ED-6D55-4677-B6DD-649C889734F0Before heading back to the train, it was of utmost importance to us to have a Belgian waffle…in Belgium.  The signature Belgian dessert is available all over the city and I don’t believe that you could pick the wrong one here.  The waffles are made to order so they are fresh and you have a wide variety of toppings to choose from.  I had mine with whipped cream and caramel.  My dad had his with whipped cream, strawberries, and a drizzle of chocolate.  Pure heaven as you can see from the photo.

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Souvenir requests from home mostly consisted of chocolate and there are shops everywhere.  Although I personally don’t really care much for the taste of chocolate, the sweet smells were everywhere.

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My advice to someone traveling to Bruges, linger as long as you can!

A Few Words on Glamping

Last summer, our family decided to take a weekend glamping trip up in the mountains of Vail Colorado, in the spirit of trying something different.  Glamping is the combination of two words, glamorous and camping.  When you glamp, you stay in tents with soft beds that have high thread count linens, wood floors, heaters for the cold nights, and electricity to charge your cell phone.

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Glamping is camping for those who prefer the finer things of life but also enjoy getting close to nature.  I’ve always felt like camping, whether in a tent, an RV or pop-up camper is great as it places you right smack in the middle of nature where you can just wake up and you’re already there.  For those who enjoy the great outdoors, nothing beats waking up and stepping outside to an alpine vista, the smell of the salty ocean air, or the sounds of a rushing river.  Glamping can give you those experiences, without having to own a camper or loads of gear. For some, the thought of sleeping on the ground isn’t appealing and others don’t want to invest in a camper/RV or all of the gear needed to have a proper camping trip.  When you go glamping, everything you need is already there and all you have to do is show up and camp.

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Just like normal tent camping, where you camp (or glamp) does matter.  For our trip, even though we were in the Rocky Mountains near Vail Colorado, we were on a treeless plateau where there really wasn’t anything to do.  If we wanted to go out for the day to go to town or do any sightseeing, we had to hike down (and eventually back up) a steep and long hill that switchbacked all the way down it was so steep. You aren’t allowed to drive your car to the top so the only option was to walk or wait for an ATV to pick us up to finally make it to a parking lot where our car was.  For this particular experience, we were hoping to be able to stay at the camp without feeling like we needed to leave for anything. but being on a treeless plateau, with the sun beating down relentlessly on the camp with temperatures in the 90’s didn’t give us the feeling of it being ‘luxurious’ camping. It was nice at night as the temperatures dropped and the tents lit up and we all sat in our Adirondack chairs looking up at the clear night sky.

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In doing the research for this glamping site, the pictures gave the appearance of being shady and more private than it was. It also didn’t mention the long trek to and from your car to get up to the top of the plateau. So choose wisely when selecting a glamping trip and make sure that the location and activities fit your lifestyle.  Ask specific questions regarding amenities and what is or isn’t provided.

This particular glampground (sorry, I couldn’t resist) was tailored more towards a western theme with horseback riding, ranch style buildings, and cowboy meals.  We are more of the outdoor adventure types who like to bike, hike, and kayak and I’m sure there is a glamping experience more catered to what we like to do.

My wife and I are split about doing this again or not.  She would like to try it again but I can only say that I’d be willing to.  To be honest, I’d rather either camp in our own camper or stay in a nice hotel.

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At least the sunsets were amazing!